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Full text of "Over the Berkshire Hills"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/overberkshirehilOOhous 




VIEW OF DOUBLE HORSESHOE CURVE. GLENDALE MASS 







VER THE 



BERKSHIRE HILLS 



Prepared by tt\e HoUsator\ic Railroad. 



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"AS old as the hills," figuratively speaking, is popularly supposed to carry with the assertion the inference that 
•*»■ our Hills were made at the time " when the morning stars first sang together," but geological theories 
destroy the strength of this inference, and we are left, in these latter days, the blessed privilege only of speaking, 
without regard to their age, of the grandeur and glory alone of the hills which stand proudly up in their places 
around about us. As old as any hills, then, we may safely say — none being more grand and glorious — are the 
low-lying ranges of the Taghkanics, where " The Dome " and Monument Mountain are prominently placed, like 
sentinels, above the charming valley of the Housatonic River, as are also the closely-drawn-together Hoosacs, 
from the bases of which the Hoosac River runs quickly away to the northward. The grandeur of the hills 
and the picturesque beauty of the valleys, where both of these mountain ranges find their homes, have for 
long years fascinated the world, both at home and abroad, and made for themselves an enviable fame by 
their notably attractive features of living loveliness. 

In a preceding publication entitled "The Hills and Homes of Berkshire," the writer of these pages, only 
a few years ago, issued a hastily prepared illustrated sketch of some of the most popular points of interest to 
be found within the region of the Berkshire Hills. This found so large a constituency of interested readers 

5 



as to necessitate repeated editions, and helped to create a demand for a second work of a similar nature, which 

should combine with much of the descriptive matter of the first publication a more minute representation of 

some of the charming scenery and attractive features of landscape of the lower Housatonic valley, through 

which lies the natural route to the celebrated locality of Berkshire — 

" * * on and up where Nature's heart 
Beats strong amid the hills," 

of which region, appreciatively writes "Godfrey Greylock," who has grown gray living, loving and lingering 
among the "hills and valleys, lakes and streams, farms and fields." where Berkshire holds all these in cl 
embrace, and to whom all that is beautiful, all that is attractive, all that is notable in the charmed circle of 
his life-long home are as familiar as household words. lie says: "If the traveler seeks some object for a 
day's or a week's wonder, some tremendous cataract or heaven-piercing Cordillera, he must seek it elsewhere. 
But if he ask for a retreat among wild and picturesque scenery, adorned by much that is pleasant and refined in 
his city life, but far removed from its heat and turmoil ; where he can draw closer the silken cord of social inter- 
course and yet throw loose some of its galling chains ; where Nature ennobles by her greatness but never 
chills with a frown, he may find it all amid the varied beauty of the Berkshire Hills." 

And these hills, loved by those who live among them and revered by those who have gone out from 
homes high up on the hill-tops or down in the valleys, made famous both in legend and lyric, were never more 
magnificent and fascinating than they are to-day. Hut their fame is not of to-dav alone. They were known 
and admired of many people in other parts of the world long years ago, and long years ago they were sought 
out by the then rarely-to-be-found tourists and pleasure-seekers of our country's early days, and have grown as 
years have increased into such prominence and notoriety as an interesting and salubrious resort for seekers 

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VIEW OF HOUSATONIC RAILROAD AND RIVER, NORTH OF HOUSATONIC. 



after health and recreation, as to have long held a world-wide reputation for being a most delightful residence 
and temporary resting-place, admirably adapted for the sensible enjoyment of the pleasures and relaxations 
sought for nowadays by the world at large, in the delightful experiences of a "summer in the country." 

The attractions and allurements of the Berkshire Hills are also happily supplemented by the recognized 
advantages of their proximity to the large cities of the country, the attractiveness of the regions through which 
wayfarers naturally made their pilgrimages to find this health-giving Mecca of the hopes, and the admirable 
facilities now provided for those who choose — if only for a brief season — to enter in and dwell there. 

Journey with us, then, indulgent reader, if you will, from New York, the fast becoming metropolis of the 
world, along the borders of Long Island Sound, over the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, to the 
beautiful and thrifty city of Bridgeport, down by the Sound, where it connects with the HOUSATONIC RAILROAD, 
the latter of which reaches out its tracks of steel over, in, around ami among low-lying hills and blooming valleys, 
far away to where the Housatonic River winds its sometimes tumultuous and often tortuous courses among 

" Rough quarries, rocks and hills, 
Whose heads touch Heaven," 

from the thrifty land of wooden nutmegs, through almost the entire reach of Berkshire's limits to the quiet 
region where it finds its source, so near the summit of rugged hill-tops that from the places where emanate 
the bubbling springs, which form the river's source, the mountain ranges and the hills of the Green Mountain 
State bend low and make their obeisance to the blending beauty of their southern neighbors. 

Of the Housatonic River it is written by one who had canoed its whole length, from its laughing streamlets 
among the mountains to its open mouth down by the sea, in appreciative words like these: "A river is a 



poem. * * * An epic is likely, however, to grow tiresome ; a river, never. * * * The Housatonic 
River, the finest of poems, is the chief ornament of Berkshire County, the finest of prose." 

And this noted and beautiful river, in dashing down among the mountains or winding its way through 
widespread meadows, has many charming stretches, where it washes first the feet of the bold mountain-sides 
and then toys with the neatly-graveled road-bed of the Housatonic Railroad, grows weary in turning mill 
wheels, and anon sleeps lazily in its meadow-land bed, while coquetting with the shadows which come to it 
from both its easterly and westerly banks. Along much of its way it is closely walled in by precipitous, rock- 
ribbed mountain-sides, which seemingly have place there simply to prevent the stream from being contaminated 
by a connection with the outside world. And thus it alternately wakes and sleeps, first leaping from its forest- 
fringed bed among the hills, then lazily looking up to the sky from its grass-grown borderings, and then again 
laughing and rollicking along its way over treacherously made beds of gravel and boulders, adown rapids 
and runways, around the points of bold headlands, dropping in its descent from Pittsfield, where the east and 
west branches come together, to the famous Canaan Falls at Falls Village, 295 feet, and from thence to its 
junction with the Naugatuck River at Derby, 612 feet. 

The canoeist previously referred to, in closing a detailed description of his canoe voyage from Pittsfield 
among the hills, to Stratford on the Sound, thus graphically and truthfully writes of the Housatonic River : 
" It is a beautiful stream from beginning to end. Whoever descends it, indeed in whatever way, will undoubt- 
edly retain in memory unfading scenes of rare beauty, which he will, nevertheless, unhappily find as impos- 
sible to describe as the charms of a perfect poem." 

The writer hereof, who has journeyed frequently the whole length of the Housatonic valley, from Pittsfield 
to Bridgeport, has never done so without finding new delights, either in charming scenes of meadow land- 

9 



scape, flanked by both sloping and abrupt hill-sides, sentineled by peeping hill-tops and mingled with near and 
far mountain views of grandeur, magnificence and well-drawn lines of simple beauty. From the windows of 
the railway car hasty glimpses of all these can be seen by the eye of a watchful observer ; a drive along the 
carriage-way brings them out more clearly, but a walk of leisure along the railway track affords the best means 
of seeing and enjoying the natural beauties of the river, the valley, the meadows and the mountains. The 
glistening river, the sinuous track of the railway, the towering mountains, the piles of brown, bare and rugged 
rocks, the hamlets and villages, the activities of the pleasant rural life, all make excellent companionship for 
the pleasure-seeking traveler as he wends his way onward. Bright faces from smiling landscapes, low murmur- 
ings from the flowing river, cool breezes from the mountain-side, bright sunshine from cloudless skies, were 
the never-to-be-forgotten companions of a late-in-autumn journey "afoot and alone " through the Housatonic 
Valley, in the recently closed year of our Lord, 1SS9. which was, both in its simplest detail and in its entirety, 
so full of sensible sight-seeing and sound enjoyment, that there is no hesitation whatever in saying to all lovers 
of out-door enjoyment, " Go and do liki » inc. two, five or ten miles, as the case may be. tramping through 

the Housatonic Valley in summer, by tourists or pleasure-seekers, will furnish a fund of interesting reminiscences 
from which to draw for either recollection or recital for a long time afterward. 




EPISCOPAL CHURCH, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 



prom ^etD Y or ^ ^° Bridgeport. 



ROLLING out from under the magnificently arched and broadly trussed iron roof of the Grand Central 
Depot, corner Fourth Avenue and Forty-second Street, New York City, on a summer day, via the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, is a pleasant and agreeable thing to do, of itself alone, but when 
such travelers have the breezy hills of Berkshire for a destination, the pleasure of the hour is greatly intensified, 
and impatient tourists are often found wishing for the wings of the wind that the desired haven of rest and 
recreation may be reached with a loss of the least possible fragment of time. 

We will step into the cars with our Berkshire-bound travelers, and journey with them up through the stony 
and rock-ribbed regions of Western Connecticut, along by the waters of Long Island Sound, and from our car 
windows note the beauties and attractions of the passing hour, as we dash onward toward our destination far 
up the Housatonic Valley. 

The breezy hills of Berkshire, the beautiful valley of the Housatonic, the thrifty farm life, the pure and 
bracing atmosphere, the charming drives, excellent roadways and babbling brooks, the spirit of peace and con- 
tentment — -of rest and recreation, of cosiness and comfort ; these are all to be found in abundance in the 
neighborhood of the Dome of the Taghkanics ; and to those who know by experience of all the blessings and 

12 



benefits to be had from sojourning in summer among the Berkshire Hills, it is neither matter of wonder or 
surprise that such large numbers of people flee from the crowded, hot and dusty streets of the city, where toil 
and tumult reign, to the quiet and peaceful nooks to be found in such abundance among the hills of Western 
Connecticut or the mountains of Western Massachusetts. 

But we are off the track, and will switch back again upon the main line and move out of the Grand Central 
Depot, having bright anticipations of experiencing pure, unalloyed country-life enjoyments. We dash on low down 
through the street and avenue bowels of Gotham, at first under oft-repeated passage-ways, above the thickly 
thronged streets, and with our bundles of passage well stowed away, we get fairly settled down to the reality of 
our journey as we leap across the Harlem River, and flit scornfully by New York's ragged suburbs, until we 
reach the quiet old town of New Rochelle, when we begin to feel that we are really in the country. Then 
on, through bare and black-looking Mamaroneck, pleasantly shaded Larchmont Manor, the pretty and pre- 
tentious Westchester villages of Rye and Port Chester, and Connecticut Greenwich, with its beautiful country 
residences of wealthy New Yorkers, and where the old Americus Club House of the Tweed ring in its palmy 
days stands boldly up before the eye to the eastward, in full view while passing the famous Cos Cob bridge. 
We nod at the home-like former home of Edwin Booth, on our right after crossing the bridge, with its miniature 
forest of shade trees and long reaches of massive stone walls, on to Stamford, where, according to the little 
dodgers thrown thickly into the cars, we are assured that a " delicious cup " of coffee can here be had, and at 
the same time are informed that the opportunity of possessing this palatable drink is a boon to mankind, as 
Artemus Ward would have said in his saying days — a sweet boon, indeed. After sipping this delicious cup of 
coffee, or perhaps after gulping down oysters by the plateful, at Stamford, we rattle and roll on, with little to 
attract attention or excite admiration, save the glistening waters of Long Island Sound, with Long Island itself 

13 



stretched away against the low down horizon southeastwardly, like a lengthened cloud-bank half buried in 
restless and billowy waters. 

Ridgefield, Conn. It is extremely difficult to single out a special locality along the picturesque Housa- 
tonic System, and term it the most enchanting and restful to the tired business man who seeks a country home, 
free from the turmoil of commercial life, inasmuch as nature has been unsparing in distributing exquisite bits of 
landscape throughout this entire railroad system. 

Nooks most refreshing abound where charming rivulets and sparkling waterfalls sing and splash the live- 
long day ; glorious hill-tops rise and majestic mountains tower, possessing scenes far-reaching and superb, and 
foliage as rich and varied as elsewhere greets the eye ; where inviting valleys lie cool and refreshing. These are 
the features that mark the Housatonic Railway, and annually attract thousands of visitors to the various points 
it touches. 

Conceding all the attractions and advantages of other noted resorts, it should be borne in mind that Ridge- 
field is a typical New England village, situated in the southwestern part of Connecticut, near New York, fifteen 
miles north of Long Island Sound, on the Danbury <.\: Xorwalk division of the Housatonic System, eight 
hundred feet above tide-water, free from malarial influences and annoying insect pests. 

The famous Battle of Ridgefield, in which engagement General Wooster received a mortal wound, and the 
daring Arnold was dismounted by a bullet, is familiar to all readers of American history. 

Richfield's broad main avenue, over a mile in length, shaded on either side by massive elms and graceful 
maples, possessing gently-sloping lawns to the superb driveway ( lawns always closely mown, producing a velvety 
appearance), the many ridges affording advantageous building sites and possessing magnificent views in every 
direction, especially a most sightly view of the Sound fifteen miles southward and an enchanting scene from 

14 




HORSESHOE CURVE (Looking South), GLENDALE, MASS. 



West Mountain, taking in the Twin Lakes, and far-distant Hudson highlands and Shawaugauk range to the 
westward ; the invigorating air and the exceptionally charming drives ; excellent fishing and boating ; the social 
pleasures afforded by the well-known Ridgefield Club ; and added to all these advantages, the excellent railroad 
facilities offered by the Housatonic Company, make this village deservedly popular as a summer resort for 
people of culture and refinement. 

Good board is obtainable at reasonable prices, and the groceries and markets are above par. 

We halt at South Norwalk briefly, and then glide on to 

Bridgeport, where we stop again, and are filled with wonder and amazement as to where all the people 
belong who are ever at this depot "when the cars come in," and who are ever found elbowing and crowding 
themselves up and down the platform of the railway station. If we are only thoughtful enough at the New York 
Grand Central Depot to take the cars labeled " Housatonic Rah road" (The Berkshire Hills Route) we shall 
have nothing to do here but to see people miscellaneously run to and fro wildly, apparently demonstrating quite 
clearly what a fool humanity can make of itself without cause or provocation, when traveling, and more especially 
when traveling for pleasure. But the whistles shriek, the bells ring, the motley crowd press back from the 
edge of the platform, the ponderous train witli heavily loaded baggage cars, richly furnished parlor cars and well- 
appointed railway coaches, linked closely together, move oft to New Haven, Hartford, Springfield and Boston- 
ward, leaving us to pursue our quiet journey up the Housatonic valley. And here will the hours of enjoyment 
make themselves apparent to our perhaps wearied senses, and we can begin to breathe in the health-giving 
atmosphere which will be ours to enjoy more and more fully the farther we move onward in a northerly direction. 

Bridgeport, with its successful manufactories, its prosperous marts of trade, its handsome and well-shaded 
residence streets, and its charming social life, offers great inducements to the traveler to make something more 

16 




HOUSE OF REVOLUTIONARY FAME, GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS. 



than the short stay which the regular routine of daily train running affords, and to those who have the time, a 
tarrying of between trains, or a sojourn of a day or two more, will not by any means be lost time, but will be 
fragments of time well spent, and mayhap give greater zest for the enjoyment of what may be in store as we 
lea»ve the salt water breezes behind and go on to the region of the fresh air of the mountains. Here are the 
offices and head-quarters of .the Housatoxic System, in commodious and well-appointed rooms, just across the 
street from the railway depot, where any desired information regarding the road or the country through which 
it runs may be obtained. 



iS 



prom Bridgeport to the Berkshire [Jills. 



AFTER a brief halt amid the busy bustle at Bridgeport, always lively and throbbing in the vicinity of the 
/V railway depot, we move onward up the Housatonic Valley over the Housatonic Railroad, with an 
excellent road-bed, new and elegant drawing-room cars and coaches, and with pleasant and attentive service. 
We thread our way in among both wooded and bald knolls, and twist and turn, and come and go, forward and 
backward, until our train has much the appearance of " an eight-hand round " figure in a country dance. 
When eight miles away from Bridgeport we pass the station of 

Long Hill, where the celebrated " Parlor Rock " picnic grounds of the Housatonic Railroad are located; 
and where picnics abound during all the long summer months. Pleasant groves, shady walks, rocks and rills 
and rushing water-falls are in plentiful supply, and grounds for games, tables for picnic lunching, seats for 
lounging, swings for exercise, and all the desired belongings are generously provided. And so we pass on to 
the little station of 

Botsford, where the New Haven and Derby division of the Housatonic Railroad leads to Stevenson, 
Shelton, Ansonia, Birmingham, Derby and New Haven, and press on till we reach the pleasant region of 

Newtown, so pleasant, indeed, that during the summer months its homes are well filled, its roadways 
thronged, and its broad acres well rambled over by numberless guests from the cities, who get good air, good 

19 



living, rest and recreation and health and strength at very reasonable rates, as far as dollars and cents are 
concerned. The quaint old village of Newtown is so quaint, so quiet, so pleasantly and commandingly situated 
as to carry us captive at will, as it has Scores of other lookers-on upon its fascinating features of Nature. 

The broad and neatly kept streets and interesting turned-down hide-and-seek by-ways, the trim and snug 
residences, and the commanding views in all directions, make the village thoroughfares the most attractive and 
delightful of their kind in the ordinary reach of summer resting-places. Pleasant walks are near at hand, and 
charming drives reach out both far and near, toward every point of the compass. Up hill and down dell, " over 
the hills and far away," good roads and fine scenery abound on every hand. Fountain Lake nestles down quietly 
and lovingly just beyond the confines of the westerly village boundary, and Danbury, with its hats for all the 
world, and its industrious hatters who make them, lies in full and fair view from the highest point of the divide, 
between the village and Fountain Lake, seemingly sleeping itself to death — which it isn't — on a sloping hill-side, 
ten miles to the westward. Beautiful farms and the very thriftiest kind of pleasantly located, attractive looking 
Connecticut farm houses are scattered broadcast over all the landscape, both near at hand and afar off. The 
spires of the churches of high-up-in-the-heaven old Litchfield, where beautiful hill-top scenery and cool breezes 
woo numberless guests from their city homes and win their admiration, can be seen to the northeastwardly from 
the roundabout hill-tops of Newtown. Busy Bridgeport is only nineteen miles distant to the southward, and 
brass-bound Waterbury twenty miles away to the eastward, on the line of the New York & New England Rail- 
road. " The Glen," an evergreen-shaded, wild and picturesque drive, by the side of and over-hanging the 
waters of the Paucatuck River, just before they join those of the Housatonic River at the abrupt bend of a 
bold and rock-bound chasm, which is spanned by a picturesquely poised bridge of the New York & New 
England Railroad, has scarce its equal of interesting novelty in all New England. Here and here-abouts, 



sight-seers and pleasure-seekers can come and go at will for many an hour, taking in among other attractions, if 
it so please them, the Siamese twin tunnels of the Housatonic and New York & New England railroads, with 
their beds and roofs of solid rock, and on swinging around the circle in any desired direction, enjoying the wild 
and varied scenery here found among blossoming fields, beside glistening streams, or in gazing at well wooded 
mountain-sides, where the soft blue haze 'neath a summer sky gives a mellow brilliancy and beauty to the slowly 
broadening landscapes that roll up before the eye in the panoramic movements of summer day drives and 
rambles. 

As those who tarry here may perhaps be interested to know what is in waiting for those who wend their 
way still further up, in a northerly direction, we will proceed on our journey along the railway track and still 
continue to tattle as we go. Soon after leaving Newtown our path is sufficiently elevated to enable us to over- 
look a broad stretch of country to the eastward, from which direction we are quite likely to see trains of cars on 
the New York & New England Railroad, with locomotives panting and puffing for dear life, as if attempting to 
dive into one of the tunnels just ahead of us, and to come out far enough in advance to enable them to reach 

Hawleyville, the next station, before we do. At Hawleyville we find a "grand railroad centre." The 
Housatonic Railroad from Bridgeport to I'ittsfield and to the State Line, where connections are made for 
Albany and all points west, the New York & New England Railroad from Fishkill-on-the-Hudson to everywhere 
away down east, the Shepaug, Litchfield & Northern Railroad from Hawleyville to Litchfield, high up among the 
hills to the eastward, cross each other here, and have a brisk interchange of traffic. A few minutes will suffice 
to see all that is to be seen from the car windows, and then we move on to 

Litchfield, a most delightful and popular summer resort. It i> a beautiful, rolling country on the high 
plateau, which forms the southern extremity of the Green Mountain range, and falls rather precipitously at its 

22 




VIEW OF DOUBLE TRACK NORTH OF VAN DEUSENVILLE, MASS. 



eastern and western edges into the valleys of the Naugatuck and Shepaug. The village, 1,200 feet above the 
sea level, and far above malaria and mosquitoes, is about three and a half hours from New York City. Bantam 
Lake, the largest in the State, three miles southwest, abounds in black bass and other game fish. On its 
northern shore, with a railroad station near, is a summer house, recently enlarged and beautifully fitted up with 
twenty-eight guests' rooms, with bowling, billiards and with boating and sailing outfits. 

In the village a large summer hotel accommodates one hundred and fifty people ; another hotel fiftv, while 
there are many boarding-houses. Thirty-five city families own and occupy residences, while fifteen or twenty 
cottages are annually rented ; all increasing the ordinary town and village population by one thousand or more 
at the height of the season. 

There is no neater or more beautiful village than Litchfield. Water is being introduced, it has three miles 
of concrete walk, and its main streets one hundred and twenty to two hundred feet wide, are shaded with 
double, sometimes quadruple, rows of magnificent elms. The wide lawns and shady parks are constantly 
mown and there is a fine lawn tennis ground. 

The town is typical farming country, and a number of noted stock farms show the most improved agricul- 
ture. The roads are the finest in the county, and the drives offer easier grades than are often found at this 
altitude. The lake basin stretching from four to six miles south and west of " town hill," while, within easy 
range, numerous mountain towns and picturesque drives afford enchanting views of this most beautiful country. 

Brookfield Junction, where a branch of the Housatonic Railroad leads down to Danbury, or climbs up 
from Danbury, with its hats and its Danbury-News-Man, according to the way which one is traveling. Here 
the knolls grow higher, steeper and more peaked, but still are the prominent features of the landscape, and the 
traveler often finds himself wondering what they were made for. Thence we pass on to the quiet old town of 

24 



Brookfield, and then on again along the easterly borders of the Danbury or Still River, which, quite 
singularly, runs rapidly away to the northward, turning busy mill wheels at Brookfield, and further on, near its 
confluence with the Housatonic River, where we first sight the latter stream and reach the Housatonic valley 
proper, crossing Housatonic's waters for the first time, a few rods only above the celebrated Lover's Leap, 
a narrow, gorged water-fall, famed in Aboriginal legendary lore as well as for its natural beauties. Here we find 
one of the most striking points of interest in the valley, presenting as it does a bold representation of combined 
rugged mountain and dashing water, in one weird and wild picture, which Nature has ever hung upon the wall 
of her New England gallery. Here also we are at the side door of the charmingly located and busy town of 

New Milford, with its near-by stretch of emerald green meadows, over against bold mountain sides and 
the pleasant slopes on which it rests peacefully, looking away to the low down western sky and summer sundown 
glories, with much apparent complacency. In this charming region of land and water, blending well together, 
only a few miles away from the gateway of the Cornwall hills and gorges, the tobacco mart of the Housatonic 
valley, the hospitable home of much wealth and worth, has many attractions for summer tourists. Lake 
Wauramaug, over the hills to the eastward, but still within easy reach of the village streets, with its excellent 
facilities for fishing and rowing, and other small bodies of water where the finny tribes abound — more or 
less — have much that is tempting to the summer wanderers, disciples of the gentle Izaak Walton. Good 
public accommodations are found in the village, and attractive temporary homes among well-to-do farmers are 
easily secured in the surrounding region of country. A village green, or mall, which easily challenges com- 
parison with others of its kind in far more pretentious localities, is one of the most beautiful features of New 
England country life. The stately elms, the handsome public buildings and residences, elegant churches and 
well-kept grounds dwell in harmony together, all so near and yet so far from the maddening crowd of the 

25 



business streets and marts of trade and traffic of the town. It is a rare page of village beauty from the book 
of Nature, and the villagers may well be proud of it. The Architect of the universe made it beautiful in its 
first estate, and the hand of man has added to its natural charms, until, if it may be equaled elsewhere it 
may not well be elsewhere excelled. After leaving New Milford we pass the quiet hamlet of Merwinsville, 
the beautiful and thrifty village of 

Kent, at which latter place we find ourselves hand in hand with the Cornwalls among the mountains 

mountains with precipitous sides, with deep-cut gorges and evergreen mountain summits, at the feet of which 
the Housatonic River and the HOUSATONIC Railroad, winding their tortuous ways side by side, find scarcely 
room for comfortable resting-places without encroaching one upon the other's relegated domain. And 
now our way is closely mountain-lined on either side, rugged, rambling and rocky, our first stopping pi 
being that of 

Cornwall Bridge, a small foot-of-mountain hamlet, where peace and plenty dwell in quietness and 
seclusion, sufficiently intense, seemingly, to satisfy the most earnest searcher after a rural life, made up of 
mingled repose and natural beauty. Here grand old hills stand proudly up on either hand, as if to shut out 
the great world with its daily procession of struggles and strifes, which go to make up at one and the same time 
the gladsome and sadly-told story of human life, from the pleasant and peaceful haunts by the borders of the 
beautiful stream which here dashes along its winding way, in its course from the mountains to the sea, in undis- 
turbed possession and occupancy of the valley through which it passes — always going but never gone ; always 
moving but never resting ; a beautiful picture here, a picturesque illustration there ; attractive and fascinating 
everywhere, but nowhere presenting such scenes of bold and closely mountain-lined sublimity and grandeur as 
here among the Cornwalls. As we pass onward from Cornwall Bridge to 

26 




LAKE MANSFIELD, GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS. 



West Cornwall, we call to mind some of the pleasant attractions and traditions of the olden time of 
the region. These are thickly woven into the history of the town, and are made up of important events and 
of noted persons, making the locality one of good repute and widespread fame among men. The line of the 
Housatonic Railroad, as well as those of the carriage roads on either side of the river, from Cornwall 
Bridge to West Cornwall, both separately and collectively — for want of room to go elsewhere — continue to 
skirt the river as closely and familiarly as they do from Kent to Cornwall Bridge, and before reaching West 
Cornwall we catch glimpses — whether by rail or carriage roadway travel — of the rugged hills of the Cornwall 
range, and at the last bend in the stream before reaching the village we get a sublimely beautiful view of 
intermingled mountain scenery on either hand, with the river flowing down between, turning busy mill wheels 
and then dashing away from the work-day life of the village to a frolicsome run among the hills below. The 
waters of the Housatonic, after turning the industrious wheels of the local mills, and then sweeping disdainfully 
by the village streets and shops, turn abruptly to the westward and pass through a deep and rocky gorge, 
presenting in appearance almost a duplicate of the celebrated "Devil's Gate" in Weber Canon region, on the 
Union Pacific Railroad, in Utah. The town of Cornwall finds its entire western boundary on the eastern banks 
of the Housatonic River, and to reach the farms and firesides of the town, which almost uniformly rank high in 
comparison with the world at large, in their records of admirable and progressive farm life, industrious and 
intelligent citizenship and well-appointed, hospitable home, some vigorous climbing of hills will be found a 
prominent feature of the programme. The town has always been noted for its abundance of rocks, so much 
so, indeed, that in its early days an eminent divine passing through it wrote of it : 

"The Almighty from His boundless store 
Piled rocks on rocks and did no more." 

23 



But the people did the rest, and now where once naught but wild forest and huge rocks were to be seen 
blossoming fields, snug hamlets and patches of smiling landscape dot the scene and successfully beckon scores of 
summer saunterers to there enjoy the beauties of Nature and breathe the pure air of its terraced hill-sides and 
stony valleys. To reach the different prominent localities of the town we must go up, and up, and up. Hills, 
like transfixed billows, make up the entire township, and whichever way we turn the way leads upward. The 
plan of locomotion seems to be to . drop into the depressions and to climb up the hills, and notwithstanding 
the labor and fatigue necessarily attending the undertaking, the traveler who once goes over the ground finds 
delights and enjoyments sufficient to create a desire to renew the journey again and again. One of the most 
famed — and justly so — -schools our country has ever known had its location, and was successfully conducted 
many and many years ago, a few miles back from the river, in this town. The American Board of Foreign 
Missions established here its first school for the education of foreign youth, designing to fit them to become 
"missionaries, school-masters, interpreters and physicians among heathen nations, and to communicate such 
information in agriculture and the arts as should tend to promote Christianity and civilization." From West 
Cornwall, northward, four miles more of travel brings us to 

Lime Rock, and as we swing around a curve which gives us the first view of the railway station, one of 
the boldest of rock-piled headlands to be found in the whole length of the valley stands up before us, presenting 
a striking picture of interwoven forest and terraced rock, with evergreen-crowned summit — a seemingly abruptly 
broken off spur of the Canaan Mountains. So bold and abrupt is this point that it looks to a casual observer as 
if it might easily be induced to break from its moorings among the hills and topple over upon the railway track 
and into the river, both of which lie closely along its base. Soon we are almost in hearing distance of Canaan 
Falls at 

29 



Falls Village, the best views of which are to be obtained from the western bank of the river. These can 
be had by making a detour of a mile or so to the westward from the railway and river to the interesting village 
of Lime Rock, a little village of much natural beauty, almost hidden from the world at large, among the ravines 
and rocks of the region, with an admirable pride of local life abounding and everything beautiful to look upon, 
which has here a habitation and an appropriate name. 

From Lime Rock a tramp or a drive of a mile or two, under a towering lime-rock ledge to the left of the 
way, over a well-kept carriage road leads to Falls Village, and from a prominent elevation on the hill, over which 
it passes, the village and the falls, in their continuous dash and foam of falling waters over and down among the 
terraced rock and rude boulders, may be best and most appreciatively seen. Here is one of the finest water-falls 
in New England, or rather series of falls, the upper one being an almost natural rock dam across the entire bed 
of the Housatonic River, which furnishes the splendid water power so long utilized by the iron furnaces and 
foundries of the once famous Ames Company, where Government contracts for cannon and heavy ordnance were 
filled for many and many a year, but which is now owned and occupied by the machine shops of the Housatonic 
System, the little village built up around the shops being known by the name of Amesville. After the first fall 
of an unbroken sheet the whole width of the river, the water dashes down over a series of terraced water-falls, 
making a combined fall of 130 feet ; and yet again among miscellaneously strewn boulders, through time-worn 
water channels, and on down into crevices, canals and runways, in, around and over rocks and reefs until an 
opening is reached among the hills below of too old a formation to think of. This passage-way lets the stream 
down its picturesque journey in its more quiet and peaceful progress to the sea. These falls afford one of the 
most valuable localities for water-power in our country, and enterprising capitalists long ago expended many 
thousands of dollars in constructing raceways, canals, supplemental dams and water-shutes on the east side of 

31 



the river, with the view of making a second Lowell or Holyoke — or at least a very big Falls Village. But the 
power has not yet been utilized, excepting as of old on the west side of the stream, for purposes before 
mentioned, and the tooth of time is already telling on the expensive dykes and unused floodgates of the 
enterprise. Another stretch of travel of six miles brings us to the thriving and beautiful village of 

Canaan, where the Central New England & Western Railroad crosses the Housatonic Railroad in its 
passage from Hartford to Canaan, fifty-five miles to the eastward to Millerton,on the Harlem Railroad, fourteen 
miles to the westward. In passing from Falls Village to Canaan, when a mile or two away from the falls to the 
northward, the marble veins — which are so prominent a feature a score of miles still farther on — begin to show 
their whitened spots against the hill-sides, and the polished brow of the noble Dome of the Taghkanics glistens 
in the sunlight far up against the sky to the westward. Canaan is the second "railroad centre" on the H 
tonic System, which is protected by a double body-guard of mountains — the Canaan Mountains standing over 
the pleasantly located village on the edge of the Sheffield and Salisbury plains on the one hand, and the southern 
extremity of the Taghkanic range in an opposite direction. When a short distance farther on, we pass out of 
the State of Connecticut into the State of Massachusetts, and are at Ashley Falls, where the Konkapot River 
comes rushing down and joins the Housatonic. 



32 




GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS., FROM KNOB HILL. 



^ 'Pour through the gerkshircs. 



SHEFFIELD, where good hotels and good company among the villagers, and good cheer at the farm houses 
out on the plains and up along the hill-sides, attract summer visitors in large numbers. Rut we have 
scarcely time to count the whole of the depot attendants, who always cling fondly to the station and its platform 
at train time, before we again move on and strike out on the first and only long stretch of straight track of 
which the Housatonic Railroad can boast. This is so unusual a feature in the line of the road, that travelers 
may be pardoned for imagining that they have bolted the track and are being run away with acr 
leaving Sheffield, with three or four miles of road-bed as straight as an arrow, and with the climbing of a In 
grade at the foot of which we cross the clear waters of famed Green River, we are in the beautiful and 
bustling village of 

Great Barrington, it is one of the most charmingly attractive villages in or out of Berkshire. Its 1 ■• 
streets, numberless huge elms, neat and well-kept houses, and the bustle of its business center, are all pleasant to 
the ear and eye, and have won for it much admiration, both at home and abroad. 

Good hotels and superior accommodations for guests from the cities among village residents and farmers 
are some of the attractive features which the town presents. Its elevation and perfect drainage secure the 

34 



absence of malaria and mosquitoes, and as a point within four hours of New York, and convenient to other cen- 
ters, it is regarded as one of the most healthful and attractive, and in its charming scenery, delightful drives 
over the finest gravel roads, shooting, boating and fishing, Great Barrington^with its surroundings, has few rivals 
in all New England. 

The scenic beauties of the near vicinity are marked and striking, and the drives are widely admitted to be 
the finest known. This town, as do many of the adjoining ones, takes pride in keeping its roadways in most 
excellent condition, and the nature of the soil is such that they are always good and always in order for enjoy- 
able pleasure riding. 

The view we give of the village is a southwesterly one, and is taken from the hill near Mansfield Lake. 
It represents the village correctly, as being a nest of homes resting at the foot of bold, rugged mountains, 
which separate it from the outside world. The sunsets are often of marvelous beauty. The best effect is 
obtained from the lower portions of the valley, because the observer is then in the shade of the western hill. 
This village is the center from which- travel radiates eastwardly to the mountain towns of New Marlborough, 
Sandisfield, Monterey and Tyringham ; westerly, to Alford, Egremont, Mount Washington, and to the Columbia 
Co., N. Y., border towns of Copake, Hillsdale, Austerlitz and Spencer-town. 

On Egremont plains, with its long stretch of level surface, and at the pleasant villages of North and South 
Egremont, the latter with an excellent and well-patronized summer hotel, beautiful scenery, fine drives and 
thrifty homes are found throughout all the region, between the bright green river and the frowning Taghkanic 
Mountains. Alford, to the northward, is a little hamlet surrounded by bold hills and quiet and peaceful belong- 
ings on every hand. Mount Washington and its dome of the Taghkanics, its Sky Farm, once the home of the 
Goodale Family poets, and its wild falls of the Bash-Bish, make one of the most notable towns in Berkshire 

35 




DEPOT, STOCKBRIDGE MASS. 



County. To represent the whole series of falls in completeness would require more pages than we have space 
for in this volume, and it would be a difficult matter, indeed, to fully illustrate them in picture. 

In the old-time stereotyped advertising phrase "they must be seen to' be appreciated." Six miles to the 
eastward of Gt. Barrington village lies Lake Buel, a lovely sheet of water and a place of much resort by excur- 
sionists, picnic parties, campers-out and pleasure seekers from all the regions round about, for many and many a 
mile, during the long summer and autumn months. Accommodations for the public are sufficient in the way of 
boats, picnic grounds, horse-feeding, and so on, at both ends of the lake. This is one of the most frequented 
lake resorts in Berkshire. 

Of Monument Mountain, one of the most celebrated points in the Housatonic Valley, we regret that we 
cannot give a view of the wild scenery which it presents from its different points ; it being at once singularly 
picturesque and strikingly attractive from whichever side or point it may be seen. Here the rocks are 

" Shaggy and wild, 
With mossy trees and pinnacles of flint, 
And many a hanging crag." 

And— 

" Sheer to the vale go down the bare old cliffs — 
Huge pillars, that in middle Heaven upbear 
Their weather-beaten capitals ; here dark 
With moss, the growth of centuries, and there 
Of chalky whiteness where the thunderbolt 
Has splintered them." 

These are the words of the poet Bryant, whose " Monument Mountain " poem made it famous long years 
ago. Monument Mountain derives its name from a curious pillar on its southern slope, raised by the Indians 

37 



J 



for some unknown purpose. This mountain has long been famous for the views of extraordinary beauty from 
its summit and from its dizzy precipice. Below is the valley of the Housatonic, with the famous river itself 
winding through its emerald fields, in appearance like a ribbon of silver unrolled, and which may be traced 
almost to its source, thirty-six miles away, beyond the Lenox hills. 

In any direction one may look, are farms and farm-houses, and herds of sleek cattle, grazing up to their 
eyes in the lush grass, for which these mountain slopes are famous. In the north end of the village, where a 
spur of the mountains comes to an abrupt end, a cave is formed by the disruption and falling together of rocks. 
If is known as Belcher's Cave. The place is often made the object of easy, summer day's walks, by those who 
want to see what the rough hand of Nature has done and to get the refreshing coolness imparted to the air by 
rocks and shade. 

A more pleasant walk, and an easy one, is to Mount Peter, in the south end of the village, from whose sum- 
mit charming views may be had. A walk or a drive of only a few minutes will take one to Berkshire Heights, 
the view from which is not excelled in all Berkshire. A more difficult walk is to East Rock and the top of 
Mount Bryant, at an elevation of 1448 feet above the sea. This huge boulder affords a resting place, com- 
manding one of the broadest and finest of Berkshire's many mountain top outlooks. 

There is no lake in the county whose immediate surroundings are more picturesque than those of Long 
Lake, three miles to the west of north. The lake has an Adirondack appearance, with its forest margin, its 
clear water and overhanging mountain. 

For the last fifty years, Great Barrington has been known to many of our great masters of landscape paint- 
ing. Lovers of beautiful scenery have sketched many of the picturesque views of the vicinity, and have done 
their share with Bryant to make the whole region classic. City people who remain here till the last week of 

33 




MAIN STREET, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 



September will be much interested to see a country fair. The fair of the Housatonic Agricultural Society, in 
this village, is next to the largest one in the State. The village of Great Barrington has unexcelled natural 
advantages in the picturesque and the beautiful. Variety is prolific and surprises are unceasing. Village 
neatness is conspicuous ; the street fences are nearly all removed ; handsome lawns, nice houses and graceful 
trees are on every hand ; an air of thrift, comfort and well-being pervades. 

Under the new life that has been given to Great Barrington within a few years, the town is coming into 
greater prominence than ever as a summer and autumn resort. Journeying on to the northward by rail, two 
miles away from Great Barrington village, we find 

Van Deusenville, where the railway forks, one branch following up the valley of the Williams River to 
the village of West Stockbridge, and on to a connection with the Boston & Albany Railroad at State Line, for 
Albany, Saratoga, Utica, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago and points 
while the other leads directly up through the busy manufacturing village of Housatonic, on through the wildly 
picturesque scenery to Glendale, and from Glendale to the famous village of 

Stockbridge. This village has a reputation as a summer resort which attracts to its well-kept hotels, 
the principal hostelry, the Stockbridge House having the well-earned reputation of being one of the best hotels 
in the country ; its cottages and fine homes, full houses and admiring guests, which increase in numbers with 
every passing year. 

With the country villas and cottages thrown open and the hotels well-filled, the summer life here is one of 
most sensible enjoyment. An extensive public park has lately been laid out on the hill to the northward, by 
Cyrus W. Field, a native of Stockbridge. The village neatness is the wonder of every stranger. The main 
street is from one hundred and twenty to one hundred and fifty feet wide, and all the streets outside the w; 

40 



way are kept cl6sely mown and clean. Almost every house in town has a handsome lawn around it and flowers 
before it. One of the most noted scenic beauties of Stockbridge is its famous " Bowl," in the extreme north- 
erly part of the town, and so close to the line which divides it from Lenox that it is often thought to belong to 
the latter town. 

The prospect from around the rim of the " Bowl " is very fine indeed, and attracts many visitors. Walks 
about town are in numerous directions. A favorite one is to Ice Glen, a cleft across the spur of Bear Mountain, 
a short distance from the village. Here in a deep, cool, shady, wild ravine of irregular formation, is a luxurious 
retreat in a hot day, where ice is found all summer down among the fallen rocks. Beyond Ice Glen a mag- 
nificent mountain outlook is had from Laura's Rest. Here the range of vision extends wide into Connecticut, 
New York and Vermont, on nearly every side of the observer, and the beauties that are spread before him are 
transcendent. 

Fine sidewalks from the center of the village from one-half to three-quarters of a mile in every direction, 
and these, well-shaded, make delightful strolls. Prospect Hill, just above the village, commands one of the 
choicest views of beauty in the world. Laurel Hill, on the edge of the village, is the object of another walk. 
A walk to "Cherry Cottage," is often taken by those who want to go three miles. But the stranger in Stock- 
bridge needs no direction to find the beautiful. It is everywhere ! At South Lee, two miles from Stockbridge, 
we are within a three-mile drive of 

Fernside. This is a popular summer resort. From South Lee, again by rail to Lee, is only a rattle, a rush 
and a rumble along the track and across the Housatonic River, and its little outstretch of meadow at this point, 
and the thriving village of Lee is at hand ; the beauties and business of which are but poorly represented from 
the car windows. 

41 




rf „».*?*■' 



SCENE ON HOUSATONIC RIVER, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 



Lee is a very small name for a beautiful and what Yankees call a smart town. Nestling among the foot 
hills of these mountain ranges, midway between old Greylock and Mount Washington, and divided by the swiftly- 
flowing Housatonic, Lee has enough beauty to satisfy the desires of its children. Many portions of Lee are 
exceedingly beautiful ; indeed the whole western portions of Lee are exceedingly beautiful and much the same 
as Stockbridge and Lenox. On the east of the village and in close proximity to it rises the rocky eminence 
called " Fern Cliff." The summit is crowned with a beautiful grove of hemlocks. This is the trysting-place of 
the villagers, and no spot could be more charming for a picnic and walks by daylight and moonlight. 

One of the most charming features in the scenery of Lee is " Lamel Lake," a beautiful sheet of water, 
situated in the northeast part of the town. The outline of this lakelet is marked by bays and capes, and its 
shores, here and there beautiful with groves of pine, hemlock and maple. The land rises in gentle slopes from 
the water, furnishing beautiful sites for country seats. 

Lenox, one of the most fashionable resorts in New England, is located on hillside and on hilltop, where pure 
air abounds, and overlooks the villages, farms and homes to the southward as far as the eye can reach. Stock- 
bridge Bowl lies near at hand, with other miniature lakelets not far away, wooded hills, cultivated fields, and 
villages without number dot the landscape between Lenox and the Dome of the Taghkanics, which shut out 
the world from between here and the great beyond. 

Wealthy New Yorkers, Philadelphians, and Bostonians have here erected extensive villas, and found a sum- 
mer resort peculiar to itself representing much aristocracy of wealth, refinement and culture. The elegant 
residences are open early, kept open late, and the season is a long one, the society being more exclusive and 
aristocratic even than that represented by the ton at Newport. The old town has been completely metamorphosed 
within the last quarter of a century, and palaces stand now where plain farm-houses once had place. 

43 



Elegant equipages dash up and down the village streets, and out upon the hillsides, club houses, for both 
sexes, are well maintained, and the gayest of the gay, in its own way, is Lenox during the summer months. The 
drives and walks in and around Lenox are incomparably lovely. To characterize the peculiar charms of each 
one would take many pages. Whatever way one turns, the variety will be found inexhaustible and the beautv 
exquisite. 

The favorite game among the younger people is tennis, which is played at many private courts, and at the 
courts of the Lenox Club. Archery is indulged in to some extent. The appearance of Lenox Village is that of 
the most exacting neatness and beauty. Not a blemish offends the eye. Tasteful homes, smooth lawns, flowers, 
graceful trees, the coming and going of handsome equipages and many harmonizing accessories please the sight 
constantly. 

The season in Lenox used to end the first week in September. Now the height of the season is in October, 
and many people remain till November or December. The season is a very long one in Lenox, beginning in the 
early summer, and making a round of summer, autumn and part of winter. That Lenox is really what its 
admirers claim for it, is proved by the fact that people who come here have most of them done extensive travel- 
ing where the finest scenery in the world is found, and that they are people of taste and culture, whose opinion 
is law. 

But perhaps enough has been said to give the reader a good idea of Lenox. Nothing now remains for the 
stranger to do, but to visit the town and see for himself. From Lenox station, the Housatoxic Railroad takes 
us quickly to 

Pittsfield, the county seat of Berkshire, a thriving and beautiful city. Around the city of Pittsfield, the vallev 
in which it lies, is practically a large amphitheater, nearly hemmed in on all sides by mountain ranges or high hills. 

44 



This city, with its wide streets, stately elms, the thrift and intelligence of its inhabitants, at once apparent, 
and the general appearances on all hands, denoting substantial well-being — possessing all these, this city has 
a dignity, a maturity, a stability, that is impressed upon every visitor. In Berkshire, where every one of its 
thirty-two towns has its own peculiar natural advantages and attractions, it is difficult to say which is the most 
pleasing or abounding most richly in that which is grandest and best. Pittsfield has six lakes, either wholly or 
in part within her borders and some of them are of considerable size ; and at each end of the city east and west 
flow the two sources of the Housatonic River, uniting nearly at its south border line. 

There is no end of views, some of them bewitchingly grand, and many quiet nooks from almost any point. 
Greylock looms up in all its grandeur and pride, as though keeping sentinel over the northern portal to the 
valley, and lying at its feet the Hoosac and the Housatonic. Pittsfield, as seen from such an elevation as that 
on the hillsides of Washington up to Lake Ashley, with the city in the distance and the two lakes, Onota and 
Pontoosuc, apparently at your feet, is a lovely picture. 

The roads of the city embrace some of the finest drives in the country. The city's principal streets, 
North, South, East and West, diverging from the park, are wide, straight and lined with huge trees, mainly elms 
and maples, on each side. The lakes of Pittsfield are an important feature of its attractiveness, and every year 
the two principal ones have become resorts either for a day's pleasure or for camping parties. 

Onota Lake is one of the largest and at the same time one of the most beautiful sheets of water in the 
whole country. From various points along its shores the most beautiful views are obtainable. The lake is 
easy of access and can be driven to from nearly every point. Pontoosuc Lake, two miles north of the center, is 
the next largest in size, and lies partly in Lanesboro. The highway skirts its eastern shore, and is one of the 
popular drives out of Pittsfield. At the lower end, in Pittsfield, are two lovely pine groves, where camping and 

45 





STOCKBRIDGE BOWL, STOCKBRIDGE. MASS. 



picnicing parties find a day's outing most enjoyable. From this place the view to the north is delightful, taking 
in the hills farther on in Lanesboro, with Greylock beyond, Constitution Hill and others, while to the west are 
the Taconics, two miles away, the reflection of whose peaks in a bright day is plainly seen on the bosom of the 
placid lake. Gunn's Grove is also a delightful camping ground. Streams are numerous, and many of them 
picturesque, in different parts of the city, some of them affording good fishing. 

Maplewood Institute, which has heretofore been a school for young ladies, opens its doors during the warm 
weather for the accommodation of summer guests, who have the advantage here of combining country life with 
city belongings, a little more to the full than can be accomplished among any of the surrounding neighborhood. 

From Pittsfield, a branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad leads still to the northward, through Cheshire, 
Lanesboro, and Adams to 

North Adams. This town is the largest town in Northern Berkshire. The population is about eleven 
thousand, and is the opposite of the Pittsfield quietude, in that it is busy, enterprising and pushing. The 
natural scenery of North Adams is unexcelled in the county. Emptying into the east branch of the Hoosac, a 
mile from the center, is Hudson's Brook, rising in Clarksburg, and upon which stream is the great curiosity of 
Northern Berkshire, the Natural Bridge. This enlarged fissure, down through which the water rushes, is of 
white marble. The depth of the fissure is at least sixty feet, and at several points the stone almost closes over. 
The upper end of the chasm is very narrow, but it widens after the plunge of the stream and is accessible, 
forming a spacious chamber. The echoes are grand in the subterranean passage. There are numerous pools, 
and protruding spurs of rock divide the stream, so that each fissure is almost a cave by itself. 

The stream once fell over a high precipice on the south, but through chemical action has disintegrated the 
limestone beneath it, leaving two masses of rock, connecting the sides and forming natural bridges, though the 

47 



upper one is much broken. The lower one is arched and the stream runs fifty feet below it. This is without 
doubt one of the most romantic spots and one of the rarest bits of the work of Nature in all Berkshire. It is 
within easy walking distance of the village. Up on the Florida Mountains, east of the village, some of the finest 
of views are obtainable. 

The notch is an interesting part of the town. The foot hills are its eastern boundary, and the mountains in 
the Taconic spur, its western. The notch brook supplies the town with water and the stream has upon it the 
" Cascade," where the mountain stream comes tumbling saucily along until it makes an abrupt plunge of about 
forty feet into the abyss below. There is a deep gorge between the hills, with overhanging rocks, covered with 
moss and ferns, and here in a deep shade of the pines the situation is somber and romantic. The drive up the 
Notch road is romantic. In many places the trees overhang the highway, making a delightful shade, and some 
abrupt turn in the road will open to view a most magnificent surprise of scenery below. 

The drive to Williamstown is another very pleasant one. As a whole, North Adams possesses many attrac- 
tions, and the tourist will have much to repay him for the time he may spend in drives and rambles during the 
stay that he may make within the town and its neighborhood 

Williamstown, Mass., the seat of Williams College, is a glorious old town, where delightful scenery and 
pure air are to be had without money and without price, and good accommodations for summer guests abound. 

This village is a gem ; a college town with many buildings, college and society houses, some of them of 
unique architecture. The college buildings are well worth a visit, and the chapel, with its ivy for each of the 
classes for many years back is suggestive of many recollections dear to the alumni. The main street of 
Williamstown is sixteen rods wide, and beautifully laid out. Besides the main street there are several lateral 
streets, all of them finely shaded and with handsome dwellings. 

4S 



There are many fine drives. Two popular drives in the village are known as either the " Long Oblong " or 
the " Short Oblong." The attractions in the neighboring towns are numerous, and extended reference to them 
will be found in articles on those towns. 

For many years Williamstown has been a summer resort of high quality. The social and educational 
features, and the natural beauty, wildness and picturesqueness of the town and its neighbors, make it a choice 
place of resort, whether for a short vacation or for the season. 

In brief review, then, of the attractions and advantages of the Housatonic Valley and its beyond to the 
northward in Berkshire, it is simply a matter of truth to say that no region of country now being sought for by 
health and pleasure seekers, has more in the line of sensible and pure vacation enjoyment than has the Housa- 
tonic Valley and Berkshire County, from its southern borders at the doorway of Western Connecticut to its 
ragged edges at the northward, up among the green mountains of Vermont. 

The whole region is within easy access of New York and the sea-coast resorts, Boston, the White Mountains 
and Saratoga, the Housatonic Railroad running through the entire length of the Housatonic Valley to Pitts- 
field, and the Boston & Albany and the Central New England & Western railroads running directly across it, 
thirty miles apart at right angles. 

Berkshire scenery has been admirably written and read of for many and many a year in prose and verse, in 
story and song, and each summer adds to the throngs who are seeking information as to how to reach the 
Berkshire Hills, and what there is to be found there after they are reached. 



49 




MONUMENT TO STOCKBRIDGE INDIANS, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS 



gummer ^ours and J^ates da JJousatonic {Railroad 



THE BERKSHIRE HILLS ROUTE. 



Excursion Tickets will be placed on sale June 1st, and will be withdrawn from sale Sept. 30th. 



Excursion No. r. 

ALEXANDRIA BAY, N.Y., AND RETURN. 

(Form Ex. 50 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

New York Central & Hudson River R. R. . to Utica. 
Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg R. R ...to Clayton. 
Steamer to Alexandria Bay. 

Returns t g by same Route. 

Bridgeport $15 150 | New Haven $15. 50 



EXCURSION No. 3. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., AND RETURN. 

(Form Ex. 52 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Buffalo. 

Returning by same Route. 

Bridgeport $17-25 | New Haven $17.25 



51 



Excursion No. 4. 
buffalo, n. y., and return. 

(Form Ex. 53 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Buffalo. 
Route Returning : 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Albany. 

Day Line — Hudson River Steamers to New York. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R...to 

Bridgeport $18.40 | New Haven $18.75 



Excursion No. 5. 
caldwell, n.y., and return. 

(Foum Ex. 54 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Saratoga. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R....to Caldwell. 
Returning by same Route. 
Bridgeport $10.25 | New Haven $10.25 



Excursion No. 6. 
hadley 'luzerne', n. y., and return. 

(Form Ex. 55 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Saratoga. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R R. ...to Hadley (Luzerne). 

Rl- I ITRNING BY SAMS R< lUTE. 

Bridgeport $10.00 New Haven $10.00 



Excursion No. 7. 
howe's cave, n. y., and return. 

Ex. 56 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. K to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R....t0 Howe's Cave. 
Rl 1 ITRNING BY S ME ROD I K. 

Bridgeport $8.00 ' New Haven $8.00 



52 






Excursion No. 8. 
montreal, p.q..and return. 

(Form Ex. 57 S.) 

Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Saratoga. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Rouse's Point. 

Grand Trunk R'y to Montreal. 

Returning by same Route. 
Bridgeport $18.25 | New Haven $18.25 



EXCURSION No. 9. 

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y..AND RETURN. 

(Form Ex. 58 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line- 
Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Niagara Falls. 

Returning by same Route. 

Bridgeport $17.25 | New Haven $17.25 



Excursion No. io. 
niagara falls, n.y..and return. 

(Form Ex. 59 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Niagara Falls. 

Route Returning : 

New York Central & Hudson River R.R...to Albany. 

Day Line — Hudson River Steamers to New York. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R...to 

Bridgeport $18.40 | New Haven $18.75 



Excursion No. u. 
quebec and return. 

(Form Ex. 60 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R; ...to Rouse's Point. 

Grand Trunk R'y to Quebec. 

Returning by same Route. ■ 

Bridgeport $23.00 | New Haven $23.00 



53 



Excursion No. 12. 
saratoga, n.y., and return. 

(Form Ex. 6i S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonic R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R....to Saratoga. 
Returning hy same Route. 
Bridgeport $8.00 | New Haven $8.00 



Excursion No. 13. 
saratoga, n.y..and return. 

(Fokm Ex. 62 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonie R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Albany 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Saratoga. 

Route Returning : 

Fitchburg R. R to North Adams. 

Boston & Albany R. R to Pittsfield. 

Housaton ie to — 

Bridgeport $9.00 | New Haven $9.00 



Excursion No. 14. 
saratoga, n.y., and return. 

(Form Ex. 63 S.) 
Route Going : 

Housatonie K. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany R, R I • Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s K. R....to Saratoga. 

Root e Ri 1 urning : 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R, R....tO Albany. 

Daj Line — Hudson River Steamers to New York. 

New York. New Haven & Hartford K.k 

Bridgeport $8.50 New Haven $8.85 

EXCURSH tN No. 1 ;. 
SARATOGA, N. Y., AND RETURN. 

Rod ik Going : 

Housatonie R. R to State Line. 

Boston & Albany K. K v. Albany. 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s K. K to Saratoga. 

Route Returning : 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co,'s K. R....tO Albany. 

People's Line Steamers to New York. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford K.K. ..to 

Bridgeport $8.00 New Haven $8.35 



54 



Excursion No. 16. 
saratoga, n. y., and return. 

(Form Ex. 65 S.) 

Route Going : Route Returning : 

Housatonic R. R to Pittsfield. Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.'s R. R to Albany. 

Boston & Albany R. R to North Adams. Boston & Albany R. R to State Line. 

Fitchburg R. R to Saratoga. Housatonic R. R to 

Bridgeport $9.00 | New Haven $9.00 



55 




LAUREL LAKE, LEE, MASS. 



List of Hotels and Summer Boarding Houses, 

ON OR NEAR THE LINE OF THE HOUSATONIC RAILROAD, " THE BERKSHIRE HILLS ROUTE." 



Post-office and Railway 
Station. 



Adams, Mass 

Bantam, Conn 

Canaan, Conn 

Cornwall Bridge, Conn 

Cornwall Plains, Conn 

(Cornwall Bridge Station.) 

Falls Tillage, Conn 

Great Barrington, Mass 



Hotel, Boarding House, 

Private Residence, 

or Farm House. 



The Greylock . . . 

Farm house 

Private residence 

Hotel 

Private residence 

Private residence 

Private residence 

Farm house 

Boarding house. . 

Hotel 

Private residence 

Hotel 

Collins House. . . 
Private residence 



Name of Proprietor. 



Geo. R. Whipple. 



A. W. Kilbourn.... 

T. Brondage 

Mrs. J. K. Wallace. 
Delia Westoren 



E. W. Warner.. 
O. P. Root 



Mrs. Mary Wadhams. 



Miss Payne 

Mrs. John Bradford 

Robert Baldwin 

Mrs. C. H. Guion . . . 



E. J. Dudley 

Mrs. M. Hall 

Mrs. H. B. Mead. 



C. Ticknor 

W. B. Loveland. 

Alfred Peck 



John Sanford 

Sarah Moore 

Mrs. W. D. Sexton. 
Mrs. Isaac Rice 



Miles 

from 

Station. 



3K 
3& 

3K 
3% 

rorods. 






Terms per Week. 



Adults. 



Apply. 

$7.00 
7.00 
7.00 
7.00 

6 to 7 
6 to 10 

6.00 

8.00 
8.00 

8.00 
9.00 

Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 

12 to 17 
10 to 12 

8 to 15 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



Children. 



Apply. 



$4.00 
3 t° 5 

3.00 

4.00 
4.00 
4.00 

4-5° 

Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 



5° 



IS 

8 

6 

15 

3° 



5 
4 

100 

25 
SO 



15 

10 

25 



Cost of 

Transportation, 
Depot to Hotel. 



Free. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

Free. 

Bag'ge 25c. apiece 

Free. 

50 cents. 
50 cents. 
50 cents. 
50 cents. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

Free. 
Free. 

( Carriages will meet 
< guests at station 
f on notice. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Sr.oo. 



57 



LIST OF HOTELS AND SUMMER BOARDIXG HOUSES— Continued. 



Post-office and Railway 
Station. 



Great Barrinsrton, Mass . 



Goshen, Conn 

(Litchfield Station.) 



Housatonic, Mass. 



Litchfield, Conn. 



Lee, Mass 



Lenox, Mass. 



Hotel, Boarding' House, 

Private Residence, 

or Farm House. 



Name of Proprietor. 




Private residence Geo. W. Lester 2 ' , 

Goshen House A. Sperry 6 

Boarding house G. G. Crandall 6 

F. C. Bendy 6 

" Alsen Sanford 6 



Hotel P.J.Ryan 2orods 

" E. S. Buck jorods 

Boarding house Mrs. E. A. Smith 20 rods 



Lake View M. Sharkey 

I". S. Hotel i James Campbell... 

Hotel I Thos. Richard* 

Island House S. Wheeler 

Boarding house Mrs. Candee 

Miss Gillman 

F. It. Sanford 

Mrs. Gibbons 

Mrs. E. M. Keeler. 

A. S. Wright 

H. Benton 



Hotel J. H. Wood.. 

Thos. Norton. 
Private boarding J. M. Howk. . 



Hotel W. O. Curtis 

Flint House H. Mathews 

Boarding house Mrs. J. H. Curtis. 



Private residence 



Mrs. F. Washburn 
Mrs. J. Clifford ... 
Mrs. W. S.Tucker 
Mrs. J. S. Ross 



'-• 
'-• 

s 

20 rods. 

'-' 

-■'.- 
2', 

2' 3 
2', 



Terms per Week. 



Adults. Children. 



$ 10.00 

7.00 
7.00 
7.00 

500 
500 
10.00 

15 to 25 

14 to 15 

8 to 15 

8 to 15 

10.00 

12.00 

12 to 15 

5 W 7 

5 U> 7 

7 to 10 

8 to 15 

Apply. 

7.00 

20 to 30 

Apply. 

Apply. 

Apply. 

Apply. 

Arply. 

Apply. 



Apply. 

4 t" 7 
4.00 



Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 



Cost of 
Transportation, 
Depot to Hotel. 



25 Si. 00. 




58 



40 




30 


Free. 


9 


25 cents. 


200 


25 cents. 




25 cents. 


25 


25 cents. 


8 


25 cents. 


8 


25 cents. 


8 


25 cents. 


8 


25 cents. 



LIST OF HOTELS AND SUMMER BOARDING HOUSES— Continued. 



Post-office and Railway 
Station. 



Hotel, Boarding House, 

Private Residence, 

or Farm House. 



Name of Proprietor. 



Miles 

from 

Station. 



Terms per Week. 



Adults. 



Children. 



Cost of 

Transportation, 
Depot to Hotel. 



Lenox, Mass. 



New Milford, Conn. 
Newtown, Conn 



New Preston, Conn 



Private residence 



Lime Bock, Conn. . 
Liinosboro, Mass — 

Merwinsville, Conn 
Morris, Conn 



Hotel. 



Brookside 

Sunnyside 

Private residence. 



Farm house 



Private residence 
Farm house 



Weantinaug Inn. 
Private residence 



Grand Central Hotel. 
Dick's Hotel 



Hotel. 



Mrs. Geo. Ritch. 

G. N.Smith 

S O. Tillotson.. 

M. Duclos 

J. L. Barrell 

S. Cook 



C. H. Rowley. 

W. S. Royce. . 
J. A. Royce.. . 



E. R. Hurd. 



R. W. Skilton 

B. S. Hall 

Edgar Alvord , 

E. M. Mason , 

E. B. Root 

A. B. Nichols 

Gilbert Rogers. 

Howard F. Welch. 



L. C. Morris 

G. B. Camp 

A. W. Peck 

Mrs. Addie Nichols. 

M. J. Houlihan 

W. A. Leonard . . . 



F. L. Sherman. 
F. S. Brown 
("has. Carter. . . . 
C. H. Hurlburt 



2% 

2fc 



4% 
4 l A 

4J4 
4K 
4K 
3K 



U 
% 

5 l A 
5 
5 



Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 

$7.00 

Apply. 
Apply. 

6 to 7 

Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 

12 to 20 

8.00 
7.00 
7.00 
7.00 
8 to 12 
8 to 12 

5 to 8 
8 to is 
7 to 12 
7 to 12 



Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 



Apply. 
Apply. 

$4.00 



15 



3° 
25 



25 



50 
5° 

40 
100 

25 
40 



25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 

Free. 

50 cents. 
50 cents. 

Free. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

Free. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

50 cents. 
50 cents. 
50 cents. 
50 cents. 



59 



LIST OF HOTELS AND SUMMER BOARDING HOUSES— Continued. 



Post-office and Railway- 
Station. 



Hotel, Boarding House, 

Private Residence. 

or Farm House. 



Name of Proprietor. 



Miles 

from 

Station. 



Terms per Week. 



Adults. 



Children. 



s 


Cost of 


- 


Transportation, 


- — 

< 


Depot to Hotel. 


IOO 


50 cents. 


20 


50 cents. 


20 


50 cents. 


40 


50 cents. 


40 


50 cents. 


40 


50 cents. 


40 


50 cents. 



New Preston, Conn. 



North Aihims. Mass 
Plttsfleld, Mass .... 

ltldgefleld, Conn . .. 



Uoxbury, Conn 

South Eirremont, Muss 

(Great Barrington Station.) 
Sheffield, Mass 



Hotel 

Private residence 

Farm house 

Wilson House 

Richmond House 

Maple wood 

American House 

Burbank House 

Wendell I louse 

Ridgefield Inn 

Bailey House 

Elm Shades 

Boarding house 

Hotel 

Private residence 

Mount Everett House 

Hotel 

Boarding house 

Private residence .... 



J. B. Wilson 

Mrs. W. I). Sperry 
Mrs. Sarah Brown. 
Chas. E. Beeman.. 

E. R. Beeman 

Geo. C. Hopkins. . 
B. C. Norris 



Foster E. Swift. 
L. L. Scott 



A. W. Plumb... 
Plumb & Clark. 
R. E. Burbank. 
Mrs. Livermore 



J. O. Poole 

Miss 1 Bai 

J. \V. Rockwell 

I - I .oder 

G. P. Gregory . . 



S. B. Smith... 
Chas. Sanford. 



Walter B. Peck , 



J. E. Conwav. 
J. H. Bacon.'.. 
.1. II. Field ... 
Cyrus French . 
Ceo. G. Peck . 
Geo. R. Cook. 
N. K. Shears. . 



4 
3 l A 
3X 

5 

sX 
H 

1 block 

2 bl'cks 

'-. 
•4 

y> 

*x 



x 

4 



$7 tO 12 

5 to 10 
5 to 10 
7 to 12 
7 to 12 
7 to 12 
7 to 12 

Apply. 
Apply. 

Apply. 
Apply. 

Apply. 
Apply. 

10.50 

9 to 12 

10 to 15 
500 

7 to 10 

Apply. 
Apply. 

10.00 

9.00 
9.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
9.00 



Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 



$7-oo 

S-oo 
5-oo 
5.00 
S-oo 
5°o 
5.00 
S-oo 



100 
100 

200 

160 

100 

50 

60 
75 
75 
40 

25 

8 
8 

75 

75 
40 

25 
25 
50 
20 
50 



Free. 
Free. 

Free. 

Free. 
Free. 

■., j« bajr'ec 
15c. pass., 25c 
ice pa*v,2$c. bag'gc 

% . i« bae'ge. 
ISC. pass., 35c. bag'ge. 

25 cents. 
25 cents. 

$2.00. 

Free. 
Free. 
Free, 

Free. 

$1.50, by team. 
75 cts., by team. 
$2.00, by team. 



f>0 



LIST OF HOTELS AND SUMMER BOARDING HOUSES— Continued. 



Post-office and Railway 
Station. 



Stockbridge, Mass . 



Tyringham, Mass 

(Lee Station.) 
West Cornwall, Conn 

Washing'on, Conn 



YVilliamstown, Mass. 



Hotel, Boarding House, 

Private Residence, 

or Farm House. 



Stockbridge House 

Edwards Hall 

Farm house 

Boarding house 

Fernside House. . . . 

Farm house 

Private residence . . 

Private residence . . 
it 
c i 

Boarding- house. . . . 
Farm house 

The Greylock 

Taconic Inn 



Name of Proprietor. 



C. H. Plumb 

Mrs. M. A. Ward. 
Geo. P. Bradley.. 

Anson Buck 

H. H. Byington. . 

Dr. Jones. 



D. Rogers 

R. N. Cochrare. 



Frank Woodruff. 
C. L. Hickox 

F. N. Golpin 

W. J. Ford ... 
J. C. Brinsmade. 
S- L. Brinsmade 
Edwin Hollister.. 
H. T. Hickox.... 
L. E. Randall.... 



F. K. McLaughlin. 
F. K. McLaughlin. 



Miles 

from 

Statiun 






2^ 



Terms per Week. 



Adults. Children. 



Apply. 
Apply. 
Apply. 
$6 to $9 

IO.OO 

8 to 12 

6.oo 
6.00 

8 to 12 
8 to 12 
8 to 12 
8 to 15 
10 to 15 
10 to 15 
6 to 10 
6 to 10 
6 to 10 

Apply. 
Apply. 



$5107 

4 
4 



Apply 
Apply 



ico 

75 
20 

'5 

20 



i5 

5° 

25 

5 



100 
100 



Cost of 
Transportation, 
Depot to Hotel. 



25 cents. 
25 cents. 
75 cents. 
Free. 
Free. 

Reasonable. 

Free. 
Free. 

25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

25 cents. 
25 cents. 



61 




SCENE ON THE HOUSATONIC RAILROAD — THE BERKSHIRE HILLS ROUTE. 



THE 



Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works 

Ok PATERSON, NEW JERSEY. 




J. S. ROGERS, President, 

PATERSON, N.J. 

R. S. HUGHES, Secretary, 

PATERSON, N.J. 



REUBEN WELLS, Sup't, 

PATERSON, N.J. 

R. S. HUGHES, Treasurer, 

-44 Exchange Place, NEW YORK. 



Gt Barrington, Mass. 



.MID Th, 



BERKSHIRE HILLS 



FOUR HOURS FROM NEW VORK 

VIA 



New York & New Haven #Housatonic R, R. 



HE SCENIC BEAUTY OF ITS HILLS AND VALLEYS, ITS ELEVATION ABOVE THE -1 A, THE Fl R- 
*|) TILE BANKS OF THE HOUSATONIC AND GR1 1 N RIVERS, I HI HEALTHFUL CLIMATE, Till PURE 
BREEZES FROM THE MOUNTAINS, I RFFDOM FROM MALARIA AND ABS1 NCI 01 EX< I 5SIVE HEAT, 
TOGETHER WITH ITS VILLAGE STREETS ARCHED WITH GIGANTIC ELMS, THE GOOD ROADS. ABUND- 
ANT SUPPLY OF PURE WATER, PERFECT SEW] KALI , GAS AND I LECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE AND 
TELEGRAPH CONNECTIONS, EXCELLENT HOTELS, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, PUBLIC LIBRARY, FACILITIES 
FOR HEALTHFUL SPORTS, SHOOTING, FISHING, I ("C ., ALL COMBIN1 TO MAKI. THE TOWN A FAVORITE 
PLACE FOR A SUMMER'S SOJOURN, OR FOR A MORE PERMANENT RESIDENCE. 



For Particulars Address. 



■Information Concerning Property for Sale or Rent, 
Hotels or Boarding Places, cheerfully provided. 



BERKSHIRE HILLS ASSOCIATION, 

Gt. barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass. 



=DAILY LINK OR STEAMERS- 

BETWEEN 

BRIDGEPORT AND NEW YORK. 



'BRIDGEPORT STEzAWBOzAT 

COMPtAUtY'S 



STEAMER 

WATERBURY, 



'-DOCK FOOT OF SOUTH AVE., 

'BRHDGEPCFRJ. 



Leaves Bridgeport, Conn., every night ( Saturdays excepted) on arrival of Naugatuck and Housatonic evening trains. 
Returning, leaves New York daily (Sundays excepted) at n.oo A. M., arriving in Bridgeport in time for Naugatuck 
and Housatonic trains. 

CHEAPEST ROUTE THROUGH TO NEW YORK. 



THE ONLY LINE 

Connecting in Bridgeport with up afternoon 
trains on Housatonic and Naugatuck Railroads. 
Passengers can take late evening trains on 
above roads and connect in Bridgeport with 
Steamer " Waterbury," arriving in New York 
about four o'clock the next morning. 



r~ 




. . TICKETS . . 

Can be procured on steamer and at ticket of- 
fices in all stations, and baggage checked to 
and from New York. 

NOTICE.— Commencing June 21st, steamer 
"■Waterbury" will leave Bridgeport Saturday 
nights at 11.00 o'clock, and from New York 
at 5.00 o'clock P. M. Sundays. 



Freight taken at Very Lowest Rates at Company's dock in New York, Pier 35, East River, foot of Catherine Street. Bills of Lading given 

and through New York rates granted from Bridgeport on shipments to WESTERN POINTS reached via all through lines. 

ALL CARGOES COVERED BY BOTH FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 



Fare, 50 cts. Excursion Tickets, 75 cts. State Rooms, 50 and 75 cts. Berths Free. 

J. H. JENKINS, President, New York. HOWARD STAPLES, Ass't Manager, Bridgeport. 



CRESSON& CLEARFIELD 

COAL AND COKE CO. 



+ 



Miners and Shippers of the 



" Frugality " Bituminous GE0 H thacher & co. 

COAL, 



UNEXCELLED FOR 

LOCOMOTIVES, STEAMSHIPS, MANU- 
FACTURING, ROLLING MILLS, 
SMITHING, AND STATION- 
ARY ENGINES. 

SHIPMENTS ALL RAIL AND WATER. 
SHIPPING WHARVES : 

SOUTH AMBOY, N. J., PHILADELPHIA 
AND BALTIMORE. 



<?ar U/f?eel 






/T\ar}ufaeUjrer8, 



ALBANY, N. Y 



OFFICES 

No. 1 BROADWAY, 



NEW-YORK. 



N. H 



Steam. Sau; (l\\\\ Qo. 



Wholesale Dealers in 



SOUTHERN PINE, 
TIMBER, PLANK. 
AND FLOORING. 

Rift Flooring a Specialty. 



C. J. WILLENBERG, Gen'l Sales Ag't. 



ALSO 

NORTH CAROLINA PINE AND CYPRESS. 

No- 372 cHAPEL street, 

NEW HAVEN. CONN. 



ISAAC ANDERSON. GEO. M. BALDWIN, 

Ag't and Trea$. Secretary. 




GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS. 




TA KE THE 

BURLINGTON ROUTE 



CHICAGO, 



REORIA. and 

ST. LOUIS 



TO THE 



Resorts of Colorado 

Through Train- from (UK !<;<>■ D MMVX B, aha 

Through Trains fi < " / ' A OO to IUCNI'JBK, via Kansas City or 

St. J< - 
Through Trains from Tf.O HI A /> / \ I f.'K, via Omaha. 
Through Trains fr.>m J' I <</.■/ 1 /</■:> I KB, via Kansas City or 

iph. 
Through Trains from ST. LOI 1 I DjurrJEB, St. Joseph. 

Solid " PaM Vestibule Trains, Dining Cars and Through Sleeping 
and Chair Cars. Also (olid Vestibule Trains to ST. PACL and MIN- 
Thc best through line to the 

pacific: Qoast ar?d Resorts of tl?? fk)rt!?u;esc 

Tickets via, and general information concerning, the Burlii 

can In- obtained of any Ticket Agent of connecting .incs, 
or by add re 

P. S. EUSTIS, general Passu and Ticket Agent, 

C. B. & Q. R. R .. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mapletoood • 
Hotel 



PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



ARTHUR W. PLUMB 



PROPRIETOR. 



F!RST-CLASS LIVERY 



CONNECTED WITH HOTEL. 



Berkshire 



H 



ouse 



Great Barrington, Mass. 



CT^HE attractions of the Berkshire House, 
J[ the present (our 15th) season, both in 
the house and surroundings, will be more 
than in years past, and the proprietor, with 
experience here and elsewhere in hotel life, 
commends the house for accommodation of 
one hundred guests, and promises its patrons 
any reasonable provision for pleasant so- 
journ, and would be pleased to see you 
among its guests. We have Mountain 
Spring Water, Electric Light, Gas, Baths 
and Closet, Billiard Parlor, and a good 
Livery Stable adjoining the grounds. No 
bar. No dogs. 

Yours, etc., 

C. TICKNOR. 



5ummer Jours 



VIA THE 



Qreat ^al^es 



■ BY WELL-KNOWN ■ 



p ASSENGER STEAMERS 



[ ake fi uperior J ransit Q ompany 



Publications for 1890 issued about May ist, 
to be had upon application to 

T. F\ CARPENTER, 

General -Passenger Agent, 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 



A. A. MILLS, 



ESTABLISHED ie46. 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE, 93-2. 

25 NORTH STREET, 



PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



J^ouse Furnishing Emporium 

A LARGE - AND ■ COMPLETE STOCK of all . KINDS OF 

(R OCKERY, GLASSWARE, SILVER-PLATED WARE 

AND_HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS. 

SUITABLE FOR COUNTRY RESIDENCES, HOTELS, AND SUMMER BOARDING H OUR LONG 

EXPERIENCE GIVES US THE BES1 01 I v ILITIES, AND OUR VARIETY IS LARG 
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF ALL KINDS OF 

REFRIGERATORS 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



J Summer House Furnishing Specialties 



OF BEST QUALITY. AT POPULAR PRIC 



We are also Agents at Wholesale for 

PRATT'S PATENT PREPARED GASOLINE. PRATT'S ASTRAL OIL, 
Please Write for Quotations. and the STANDARD OIL COS CRYSTAL LIGHT OIL, «no kecp all grade. 




SCENE ON THE HOUSATONIC RIVER. 



WHEELER'S PATENT WOOD FILLER. 

/^ThIS article has revolutionized the old system of finishing wood. Not only hardwood, but even pine, to-day is being finished 
^-f in its natural beauty ; hence very little painting is now being done inside of new houses. The successful introduction of 
this article has, therefore, not only been of benefit to the rich, but its effects are also seen and enjoyed in the cottage of the 
industrious mechanic. The fine and beautiful finish observed in our public and private buildings, railroad cars, etc., etc., are 
monuments to the merits of this article. Its success has led many to attempt to counterfeit and palm upon the public many 
so-called " just-as-good " articles. Beware of these and see that our name and trade mark are upon each and even - package. 
fS^TSend for our new Price List and Pamphlet giving full description of how to finish wood naturally — FREE. 



B *EiNi G . s LITHOGEN SILICATE PAINT 

f~\ S THE name implies, this paint is made with a Silex or Silica basis, and by the severe tests it has been put to for more 
^^ than twenty years has proven itself, under many circumstances, to be the most durable and economical paint made. For 
beauty of finish it is unsurpassed. Do not confound this paint with a liquid paint. Though sold by the gallon it is in a paste 
form, and requires reducing with linseed oil to the proper consistency before it can be used. 

C£?-SEND FOR SAMPLE CARD OF COLORS AND OTHER INFORMATION FREE. 



BREINIG'S WOOD DYES OR STAINS, LITHOGEN PRIMER, WHITE LEAD, JAPAN, DRYER, FLOOR POLISH, OIL, ETC. 

.„ U S» [BS : THE BRIDGEPORT WOOD FINISHING COMPANY, ^1!^'^%^ 

NEW YORK OFFICE: No. 240 Pearl Street. GRANVILLE M. BREINIG, Cen'l Agent and Supt 



F. W. DEVOE & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1852. 

Offices : Fulton Street, Cor. William, NEW YORK. 

PURE MIXED 
=PAINTS= 



If you think of doing any painting- this Spring, we wish to call 
your attention to the fact that we guarantee our ready-mixed 
paints to be made only of pure linseed oil, and the most perma- 
nent pigments. They are not " Chemical," " Rubber," " Patent," 
or " Fire-proof." We use no secret or oatent method in manu- 
facturing them, by which benzine and water are made to serve 
the purpose of pure linseed oil. 

SAMPLES OF FIFTY DESIRABLE SHADES FOR CONSUMERS ON REQUEST, 



pipe l/arpistyes^^rtists' /Materials 

PAINTERS' SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS. 



PLATE and WINDOW GLASS 

HOLBROOK BROTHERS, 

85, 87, 89 Beekman St. 53, 55 Cliff Street, 

NEW YORK, 

^ tRS AND DEAL *»s lN 



]frencb, iSnolieb anfc Hmerican 

Window and Plate Glass 

ALSO, 

Embossed Glass, Ground Glass, Cathedral Glass, 

ROUGH GLASS FOR FLOORS AND 
SKYLIGHTS. 



U. S. EXPRESS CO., and B. & O. EXPRESS CO. 



Express Forwarders via the Quickest and Most 

western and Southern States. Exclusive fast trains are run between 



Dtrii-t \ii\iitfi lo am ' from all points in the New England, 
■ ILL I I\t)LU<_S, Central, Middle. Western. South- 

New York City and Western Cities. 



M. O. BUSINESS. 

This Company issues Mon- 
ey Orders for any amount 
up to Fifty Dollars, which 
are practically good every- 
where. They are cheaper 
than Government Orders, 
or any other way of trans- 
mitting money, the follow- 
ing being the 

SCHEDULE OF RATES: 

Not over . . $ 5.00 5 ct's. 
Ovcr$ 5.00 to 10.00 8 
" 10 00 to 20.00 10 

20.00 tO 30.00 1 2 

" 30.00 to 40.00 15 

40.00 to 50.00 20 




Foreign Express Service, 
Direct connection at 

NewYork and San Francisco 

FOR 

AFRICA, AUSTRALIA, 

AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, 
CENTRAL AMERICA, 
CHINA, DENMARK. 

FRASCE, GERMANY, 
GREAT BRITAIN, 
HOLLAND. INDIA, 
ITALY, 
MEDITERRANEAN A LEVANT, 
NEW ZEALAND, NORWAY. 
POLAND. PORTUGAL, 

RUSSIA, 
SAMOA ISLANDS, 
SANDWICH ISLANDS. 
SAXOhY. 
SOUTH AMERICA. 
8PAIN. SWEDEN. 

SWITZERLAND. 



Having offices at all prominent points, Boston, Providence, Newport, Hartford, Springfield, Worcester, New Haven, Bridgeport. Dnnbury. Nrw Milford. Gratt Harrington, 
Lenox, Pittshcld, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Richmond. Va., Huffai", N V., Pittsburg, Pa., Cincinnati, <>., Cleveland, 1) . Indian- 

apolis, Ind., Urand Rapids, Mich., Chicago; III. Milwaukee, Wis., Duluth, Minn. Minneapolis. St Paul, Dei Moines, Omah 

Ky., Birmingham, Ala., Chatts 1, Penn , Vick*burg, Miss., Mobile, Ala , Nc.v < if leans, La., Galveston, Te\ , and over 3.00 j other town* . 

Southwest, with a system i>f thnmgn billing to all prominent and intermediate points. Perfect arrangements with all other companies, by which busincsx i«r anj point withia 
I he United States, < an ,la, Mexico, and all foreign countries, can he reached in perfect safety, and all points on I! ^tem. 





S(-Sf~Ci: 




STREET SCENE, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 



COR. MAIN AND CANNON STREETS, 



W. B. Hall & Co. 

+ + Bb idgepqet . 

•*• Leading Qnj Qoods F>ouse, ••• 

Are the largest dealers in Colored and Black Dress Goods, Hosiery, Underwear, Laces, Dress Trimmings, Gloves, Rib- 
bons, Notions, Curtains, Art Gfeods, and Small Wares in the State 

PROMINENT SPECIALTIES ARE SILKS, FURS, CLOAKS AND CURTAINS 

Seal Cloaks made and repaired. Alterations in Cloaks made free of charge. Large slocks of Infants' Cloaks and outfits. 
Large Stocks of Linens and Domestics. 

VISITORS AND BARGAIN SEEKERS 



Will take elevator for Cloaks, Shawls, Furs, Seal Cloak Roomv, Custom CloaV Making Department'. 

TAKE CENTER STAIRWAY 



For Cotton Underwear, Corsets and Bum-rick's Patterns. Take Basement Stairs for Rugs, Curtains and Upholstery. 
All goods marked in plain figures at ONE LOW PRICK 

LARGE MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT 



All Goods ordered by Mail shipped to any part of the State free of charge. Competent ladies and gentlemen em- 
ployed in mail order department to select goods and fill orders 

The system of selling every article at a small profit, but of a thoroughly reliable quality, is a ruling principle of 

W. B. HALL & C2CD 



Stockbridge & 

House 




PLUMB'S HOTEL, 



STOCKBRIDGE, * 

Berkshire County, Mass. 



IRamapo 









Works, 



HlLLBURN, N. Y. 



INFORMATION ON APPLICATION. 



HOUS ATONI C RAILROAD. 



THE ONLY ROUTE TO 




AND ALL THE 



Famous Summer Resorts 

iM THE 

BERKSHIRE HILLS. 

FAST LIMITED EXPRESS TRAINS 

FROM NEW YORK (DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY). 

THROUGH TICKETS and Baggage Checks btained from all Ticket Agents of Pennsylvania R. R.. Philadel- 

A phia cV Reading R. R., Central R. R. of New Jersey, and ALL lines South and West of New York City to the 
principal resorts in the Berkshire Hills via the Housatonic Railroad. Through Tickets and Drawing-room Car reserva- 
tions can be secured at offices of 

WORLD TRAVEL COMPANY, 120 Broadway, Equitable Building, or 321 Broadway. 




ORSESHOE CURVE, GLENDALE, MASS. 



ORGANIZED 1S51 



The Berkshire Life Insurance Co. 



PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

WILLIAM R. PLUNKETT, - President. 

JAMES M. BARKER, - Vice-President. 

JAMES W. HULL, - Secretary and Treasurer. 



THE BERKSHIRE HILLS. 



A fine colored map, showing lakes, mountains, rivers, val- 
leys, villages, highways, railroads and points of interest, sent 
free to any address. Apply to office of the Company, as 
above, or to 

FRED C. WHIPPLE, 

Oenertil Agent, 380 Main Street, 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



Thornton N. Motley Mo. 



RAILWAY, 

STEAMSHIP and 



CONTRACTORS' 



SUPPLIES 



O 



No. 43 John St., bet. William and Nassau Sts. 



, NEW YORK. 



HOUSATONIG RAILROAD. 

=THK SHORT LINE— 

FROM 

BRIDGE FOR T, NEW HAVEN AND 

AEE POINTS IN CONNECTICUT, 

TO 

ALBANY, SYRACUSE, COLUMBUS, TOLEDO, 

SARATOGA, ROCHESTER, CINCINNATI, DETROIT, 

MONTREAL, BUFFALO, INDIANAPOLIS, CHICAGO, 

UTICA, NIAGARA FALLS, . ST. LOUIS, ST. PAUL, 

ROME, CLEVELAND, KANSAS CITY, OMAHA, 

DENVER 
AND ALL POINTS WEST.= 



Through Tickets and Baggage Checks can be obtained from principal Ticket Agents of Housatonic system to all of the above points. 
oNLY 28 Hours from Bridgeport or New HaVeN to cHicago. 



The Little Jewel Lamp 

Messrs. F. H. LOVELL A, CO. 

No. 118 John Street, New York City, 



have just put on the market a lamp of which 
the name "The Little Jewel" is perfectly 
descriptive. This little lamp is nickel-plated 
throughout, and produces a powerful light 
with the smallest possible consumption of 
oil, one pint of oil will burn nine hours, and 
give a light equal to the power of thirty 
candles. 

The value of such a lamp can hardly be 
overes'imated. This lamp embraces all the 
valuable qualities of the best central draft 
lamps, including safety, absolute freedom 
from odor, and a brilliant white light. These 
lamps only measure four inches in diameter, 
and stand thirteen inches high, including 
chimney, or six inches to top of oil chamber. 
They can be sold for $9.50 per dozen, with- 
out shade, and $12.00 with shade complete, 
as per cut. A wall bracket, or ceiling 
hanger, into which the lamp can be set, can 
be supplied for $3.00 per dozen. 




Messrs. F. H. LOVELL & CO. 

Arc Extensive Manufacturers of all Kinds and Styics of 

LAMPS, BURNERS AND LAMP FIXTURES 

Including the Celebrated Hitchcock Lamp, which Burns without a Chimney- 



Dauid B. C r ockett C om panij 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



DAVID B. CROCKETT'S SPECIALTIES 




JYo-.. 7 mid *2 



tt 



PRESERVATIVES" 

OR ARCHITECTURAL WOOD FINISHES, and 

"SPAR COMPOSITION." 



Tor Preserving and Finishing Wood of all Kinds in their Natural 
Color and Beauty. None genuine unless bearing my name stamped 
on each can, and patented Trade Mark on labels. 



Respectfully yours. 



^g^u^^^^ 



PUT UP IN BARRELS, 5, 2, 1, 1-2, 1-4. AND 1-8 GALLON CANS. 

LIBERAL DISCOUNTS TO DEALERS AND LARGE BUYERS. 











*'■ i '*■ 


.^ ..^^Al^ a .jA . 


«*.*&« '^L 'i^H^k- ..v&.yl BMmJfl 


I 






' ,,) ■:'■ 






".■' ir ■*■.:■■:.'■''. .-'■'":? 


;■■•■ - . \ . 


. 


""^•'WIPUHpl 






1 

%*M Jku ■ 1 


i ■'■'- "* 38 



STOCKBRIDGE BOWL, STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. 




coNWaY HoUse, 



SHEFFIELD, mass. 



r ' : 



^ 



•/f HIS HOUSE IS CONVENIENTLY LOCATED NEAR THE RAILROAD STATION IN ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 
(O) AND HEALTHY VILLAGES IN BERKSHIRE; IN FULL VIEW OF THIS VILLAGE IS MT. EVERETT, THE HIGHEST 
^ PEAK OF TAGHKANIC RANGE, AND IN VICINITY ARE THE BEAUTIFUL TWIN LAKHS OF SALISBURY, AND THE 
FAR-FAMED LAKE TRUEL. SHEFFIELD IS WITHIN AN EASY DRIVE OF GREAT BARRINGTON, STOCKBRIDGE AND 
LENOX. THE HOUSE CAN ACCOMMODATE SIXTY. 




H. A. ROGERS, 



19 JOHN ST., NEW YORK, 



Railway, Steamboat, Mill and Machinists' 



SUPPLIE 



•sm. 



Sole Agent in the 
United States 

w 




<at> 



for MoncriefF 

'*y Gauge Glasses. 
W 



NEW YORK AGENTS FOR 

TANITE EMERY WHEELS, 

HART'S "DUPLEX" DIE STOCK, 
HYDRAULIC JACKS, SHOVELS, 

IRON BARROWS, RATCHETS, WASTE, 
PACKINGS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, Etc., Etc. 



,jg,, ^y^^^s".^ 



BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 



iDress (Boobs, 



Gloafts, 






Carpets. 



NEW YORK & NEW ENGLAND 


RAILROA D. 


■"Trains between boston and new york 


Leave Either City 12 00 M. 3 00 P-M. 

Arrive at the Other 6.30 P. M. 9 00 P M. 



THE SHORTEST LINE. 

ALWAYS ON TIME. 

DINING CARS 

NEW PARLOR CARS and COACHES. 

THE 3 00 P. M. TRAIN RUNS DAILY. 
Including Sundays. 



Large Mail Order Department 



T™D. M. READ CO 



OFFICE. 322 WASHINGTON STREET, j 



BOSTON 



DEPOT, FOOT OF SUMMER STREET,! 

GRAND CENTRAL STATION NEW YORK. 



Charles Howard, 

Ccner.il Manage* 



A C KENDALL. 

General Peaaenjccf A^em 




ELM SHADE; COTTAOES. 

OPEN FROM JUNE 1st TO OCTOBER 15th. 

QONS STING of three sepante buildings; with accommodations for about sixty persons; always a favorite resort for 
parties desiring a quiet soual summer home ; will open its sixteenth season, June i, 1890. 
The location is within five ninutes' walk of depot, churches, post and telegraph offices and public library. 

J. W. ROCKWELL, Proprietor, RlDGEFIELD. CT. 



i»a*^ ■ 



Comfortable and Homelike 
in Winter. 



Cool and Attraci. 1 : 
is Summer. 



A MODEL 
AMERICAN HOTELON THE EUROPEAN PLAN. 




IMS WfiMPSOiA MOTEL,* 

F1E1X11 AVI -» \ I.. NIW YOM 

hawk «« vvt; Tin inn i . PnonuiTOMi 
NEAR THE ORANO CENTRAL STATION. 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED FOR BUSINESS OR 
PLEASURE. 

Cm i .r ANn Sehvicf Rooms En Suite, Do.'Ble, Sinole 

Ut.' URPASSED. AND ROOMS WITH BaTM. 



ESTABLISHED 1- 



SWAN & FINCH, 



Refiner* and Dealers ii 



iOILS, 



151 MAIDEN LAN], 



NEW YORK. 




LIBRARY RULES 



A FINE OF FIVE CENTS WILL BE 
CHARGED FOR EACH DAY THE BOOK 
IS KEPT OVER TIME. 

Full value must be paid if the Book 
is LOST; a suitable fine if it is INJURED. 

No Books can be drawn by persons 
whose losses or fines are unpaid. 

BOOKS MUST NOT BE LENT OUT 
OF THE FAMILY TO WHICH THEY 
ARE CHARGED. 



&Jr